Blackmoore
blackmoore.jpg
The ruins of Blackmoore.

Blackmoore was an English coal mining settlement within Scotland’s borders, near Stirling. It was founded by John Blackmoore in 75 A.E. on a site abandoned in the fall and developed rapidly over the course of 65 years, with structure carefully organized around steady work and warmth. Extant architecture around the site was populated and expanded upon as the settlement’s population grew and diversified. Although smaller and less developed than Dornie, Blackmoore was emerging as a contender for Scotland’s attention up until the attack in 131. Electricity was rarely, if ever, utilized, but the development of steam-based technologies was commonplace. Confessed mages were extremely scarce and poorly understood as a result.

Leadership of the makeshift “town” appeared deceptively informal from the outside, but Blackmoore didn't maintain his reign with kindness. While open conflict was rare, suspicious disappearances were not. Subversive efforts by partners in trade to gain an advantage were often stopped before they began. His militia was small, highly selective and very keen on maintaining maximum order with swift, acute applications of effort and force. Blackmoore’s eldest son, Ivan, was an active participant in the militia and feared as a mage with a low tolerance for error. Mrs. Blackmoore was of gentler disposition and had a hand in establishing educational resources for those who wished to work outside of the mine itself.

By 130 A.E., the political climate in Blackmoore had begun to shift in favor of merchants piggy-backing on business brought in by the coal trade. John was deep into his 70s and after a falling out some years back, Ivan had left to take up residence at a nearby outpost with his wife. With no other children well-suited to leadership and an aging militia fallen into disrepair, he was vulnerable to political upheaval — on the verge of being ousted. In a last bid to maintain his relevance, John brokered a deal with a ship owner in a neighboring settlement to begin moving coal up the coast and cemented his fate. The potential for competition was too pressing for Dornie to ignore and a raid was organized to raze Blackmoore.

The raid was reported to be a success and the current status of Blackmoore is unclear. Slaves were taken, coal veins were ignited and large portions of the settlement and its surrounding outposts were burned to the ground. John was executed as the settlement bearing his name burned around him. The rest of the Blackmoore family is assumed dead.